Today: Sat 1 Nov 2014
Register & Login:  Register
   Login
Register Login

Alcohol

The following articles have the tag Alcohol

GP’s suspension upheld after skipping breath test

A TASMANIAN GP who skipped mandatory alcohol breath tests and showed a “dismissive” attitude to practice restrictions has failed in a bid to have his suspension reviewed by a tribunal.

Two questions enough to detect alcohol abuse

Two questions enough to detect alcohol abuse

JUST two questions may be sufficient for a GP to determine if a patient is abusing alcohol, a study has found.

Low-level drinking harm in pregnancy not clear

GUIDELINES on drinking during pregnancy overemphasise the dangers of low-level alcohol consumption, according to a letter to the Medical Journal of Australia.

Survey reveals alarming spike in youth alcohol and drug consumption

Survey reveals alarming spike in youth alcohol and drug consumption

HIGH rates of drug and alcohol use among troubled youths highlight the need for GPs to give frank advice to young patients at risk – even when they don’t ask for it, according to headspace CEO Chris Tanti.

Warriors NRL doctor warns of 'cocktailing'

THE NRL will this year begin testing for prescription drugs as the Warriors' club doctor said he believes many players are mixing sleeping pills with alcohol and energy drinks.

GP-based initiatives promising for reducing alcohol-related harms

GP-based initiatives promising for reducing alcohol-related harms

COMMUNITY-BASED intervention alone is unlikely to be effective for reducing most alcohol-related harms and risky consumption, according to Australian researchers.

Love boosts health — until marriage and three kids

Love boosts health — until marriage and three kids

AUSTRALIANS shot by Cupid's arrow are the happiest and healthiest in the land — until they get engaged.

Too few think of cancer drink link

Too few think of cancer drink link

JUST one-third of people see alcohol as an important risk factor for cancer, a South Australian study has shown.

Most pregnant women continue drinking: study

Most pregnant women continue drinking: study

FEWER than one in five women completely abstain from alcohol when they become pregnant, and most women (46%) continue with risky drinking, an Australian study suggests.

Doctors call for national summit on alcohol

Doctors call for national summit on alcohol

EMERGENCY doctors who spend their weekends dealing with victims of drunken violence have called on the federal government to follow NSW's momentum in tackling alcohol-related harm.

Call to curb alcohol violence gets louder

MEMBERS of the public have joined doctors and police in pressuring the NSW government to introduce tough new laws to curb alcohol-related violence.

Drinking linked to memory loss in men

Drinking linked to memory loss in men

MEN who consume more than two alcoholic drinks per day while in middle age may speed up their memory loss in later life by up to six years, a study has shown.

Federal and NSW govts worst on alcohol policy: NHAA

AUSTRALIA'S first national scorecard on alcohol policy has ranked the Federal and NSW governments as the worst performing jurisdictions in the country.

Drug dependence in detained youth high

Drug dependence in detained youth high

THE rate of detention of young offenders may be dropping but those serving time in detention have a higher rate of substance dependence and poor mental health according to two new reports.

Alcohol sends 30,000 Victorians to hospital

Alcohol sends 30,000 Victorians to hospital

NEARLY 30,000 Victorians were hospitalised in a 12-month period due to the effects of excessive alcohol consumption, new data shows.

King-hit fatalities fuelled by alcohol

AT LEAST 90 people have died after being king-hit in Australia in the last decade, with the violence fuelled by alcohol in almost two-thirds of cases, research shows.

Driving while hungover still dangerous, despite no blood alcohol

Driving while hungover still dangerous, despite no blood alcohol

DRIVING with a hangover could be as dangerous as driving under the influence of alcohol, research suggests.

Dire prediction: 500 schoolies to be hospitalised

Dire prediction: 500 schoolies to be hospitalised

MORE than 500 schoolies will end up in hospital on the Gold Coast next week, with about 18 poisoned by drugs and a further 90 suffering alcohol-related mental or behavioural problems.

At-risk drinkers going undetected as GPs fear straining relations

TWO-thirds of at-risk drinkers presenting to GPs do not have their habit picked up partly because their doctor fears straining the relationship, research presented at the RACGP’s annual conference suggests.

Stroke patients getting younger

EVER younger people are having strokes, according to two studies that warn death, disability and illness from strokes could double by 2030, partly due to unhealthy lifestyles.

GPs reluctant to screen patients for at-risk drinking

GPs reluctant to screen patients for at-risk drinking

TWO-thirds of at-risk drinkers presenting to GPs do not have their habit picked up partly because their doctor fears straining the relationship, research presented at the RACGP’s annual conference suggests.

Call to introduce real-time prescription monitoring

Call to introduce real-time prescription monitoring

BLEAK figures on the increase in deaths due to acute prescription drug toxicity in Victoria in the first half of the year provide new impetus for introducing real-time prescription monitoring, an expert believes.

Heavy alcohol consumers drinking more

Heavy alcohol consumers drinking more

AUSTRALIA'S biggest boozers are hitting the bottle harder than ever before, while light drinkers are cutting back further on the occasional tipple, according to new figures.

Drinking during pregnancy declines

ALCOHOL consumption during pregnancy has fallen dramatically in the past five years, an Australian study has found.

Study shows impotency high over 45

Study shows impotency high over 45

ALMOST two-thirds of Australian men over 45 have erectile dysfunction (ED) and the odds of having the condition increase by 11% a year, a large Australian study shows.

Vax ban could turn doctors into ‘police’

Vax ban could turn doctors into ‘police’

BANNING unvaccinated children from school could become a “serpent’s egg” policy that becomes dangerous once hatched, with doctors and teachers forced to become “police”, a former state health minister has warned.

Vax ban could turn doctors into police

BANNING unvaccinated children from school could become a “serpent’s egg” policy that becomes dangerous once hatched, with doctors and teachers forced to become “police”, a former state health minister has warned.

GP who drank with patients spared

A GP who allegedly inappropriately prescribed restricted substances, made comments of a sexual nature to his receptionist, and went drinking with patients at his local bar has avoided being deregistered.

Don’t admit if you did inhale

Don’t admit if you did inhale

PARENTS who believe honesty is the best policy may be getting it wrong when it comes to their past exploits with substance use, researchers say.

Curb alcohol industry lure: AMA

Curb alcohol industry lure: AMA

DOCTORS have called on the federal government to clamp down on what the AMA claims are blatant efforts by the alcohol industry to lure young Australians into “early and potentially harmful drinking patterns”.

Mixing alcohol with diet drinks increases drunkenness

PEOPLE who use diet soft drink as a mixer with alcohol are liable to become more intoxicated than those using full-sugar beverages, researchers warn.

Curb the festive feast and live longer?

Curb the festive feast and live longer?

BEFORE tucking into turkey over Christmas people should be aware that too much over-indulgence could shave hours off your life expectancy

Antidepressant use in pregnancy low

CLINICIANS need to be aware that women being treated for antenatal depression are more likely to be using other medications as well as smoke and drink alcohol more frequently.

Alcohol promotion on the web flying ‘under the radar’: AMA

Alcohol promotion on the web flying ‘under the radar’: AMA

ALCOHOL industry self-regulation of advertising to young people has failed, with Facebook and other social media sites enabling harmful “under the radar” promotion to young people, the AMA has warned.

Teen risk factors lead to higher BP

Teen risk factors lead to higher BP

TEENAGERS do not get away with unfavourable lifestyle behaviours such as alcohol consumption, high salt intake and a lack of exercise, a WA analysis of blood pressure levels has shown.

Government slammed over attempt to block alcohol labels

A MELBOURNE law school academic has blasted Australia’s attempts to block Thailand from introducing graphic alcohol warning labels, suggesting the government is only objecting for the sake of the Australian wine industry.

Alcohol problems may follow obesity surgery

Alcohol problems may follow obesity surgery

Bariatric surgery to treat obesity may increase patients' risk for alcohol use disorders, according to the largest study to demonstrate the potential link.

Moderate alcohol could benefit non-alcohol fatty liver disease

Moderate alcohol could benefit non-alcohol fatty liver disease

PEOPLE with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) who drink moderate amounts of alcohol are half as likely as non-drinking patients to progress to more serious liver disease, research suggests.

Fury over claim alcohol warnings could prompt abortions

Fury over claim alcohol warnings could prompt abortions

THE Winemakers Federation of Australia has sparked outrage by suggesting warnings about the risk of drinking while pregnant could prompt expectant mothers to seek unnecessary terminations.

Kids' exposure to alcohol advertising flouts guidelines

Kids' exposure to alcohol advertising flouts guidelines

AUSTRALIAN researchers have questioned children’s high level of exposure to alcohol ads on TV.

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder poorly tracked and understood

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder poorly tracked and understood

CASES of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) should be mandatorily recorded, a leading researcher says.

Cannabis doubles risk of car crashes

Cannabis doubles risk of car crashes

DRIVING under the influence of cannabis almost doubles the risk of having a crash, a meta-analysis has shown.

Sugar not as bad as alcohol

Sugar not as bad as alcohol: experts

AUSTRALIAN scientists have condemned calls for sugar to be targeted, like alcohol, with measures to curb its consumption.

Loud music appears to make alcohol taste sweeter.

Music sweetens alcohol notes

PONDER this if the Christmas or New Year party gets rowdy – loud music appears to make alcohol taste sweeter.

Boom in alcoholic energy drinks causing concern

DRINKING alcohol mixed with caffeine-containing energy drinks (AEDs) is now a “normalised phenomenon” in Australia, research suggests.

Drinking frequency linked to cancer risk

Drinking frequency linked to cancer risk

FREQUENT alcohol consumption increases women’s risk of cancer mortality by nearly a third, a study suggests. The research found high frequency drinking drives the increased risk of all-site cancers among women, whereas among men increased risk is linked to the quantity consumed, with more than three drinks on ‘drinking days’ raising risk by 24%. Pooled data from more than 324,000 US men and women, including more than 8000 cancer deaths, showed there was a mechanism between alcohol and cancer that could be used to counsel patients, addiction specialist Professor Jon Currie said. “GPs don’t have to ...

Long working hours increases alcohol problems

WORKING at least 50 hours a week increases the risk of alcohol-related problems threefold, a New Zealand study suggests. Researchers used data from men and women aged 25–30 years who were enrolled in 1977 in a birth cohort called the Christchurch Health and Development Study. The study found a significant association between longer working hours and drinking-related problems, lead author Dr Sheree Gibb (PhD), from the University of Otago, said. The longer the working hours, the worse the alcohol problem, including abuse and dependence, researchers found. Participants who worked 50 hours ...

Alcohol warnings mere PR: experts

PUBLIC HEALTH experts have slammed a voluntary industry scheme that will soon see popular beer, wine and spirit products carrying health warnings, saying the “overdue” measures will have little impact on Australia’s binge-drinking rates. The scheme, launched on 12 July by DrinkWise Australia, is aimed at convincing drinkers to ‘Get the facts’ about their alcohol consumption via the messages that will appear on product packaging. The messages will include slogans such as “Kids and alcohol don’t mix”, “Is your drinking harming yourself or others?” and “It is safest not to drink while pregnant”. While welcoming the ...

Warning labels on beer too lite, experts say

EXPERTS have slammed a voluntary industry scheme that will see popular beer, wine and spirit products soon carrying health warnings, saying the “overdue” measures will have little impact on binge-drinking rates. The scheme, launched today by the DrinkWise Australia Board, is aimed at convincing drinkers to ‘Get the facts’ about their alcohol consumption via the messages that will appear on product packaging. The messages will include slogans such as ‘Kids and alcohol don’t mix’, ‘Is your drinking harming yourself or others?’ and ‘It is safest not to drink while pregnant’. The latter message is also to ...

Drinking on the job common practice

ALMOST one in 10 Australian workers admit they usually drink alcohol at their job, while fewer than one in 100 say they usually use drugs at their workplace. Researchers used data from the 2007 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS), which polled over 23,000 Australian residents aged 12 and over on their use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. They found alcohol use was “widespread” in the workplace and most likely to occur higher up the management chain, while tradespeople and unskilled workers were more likely to use drugs at work. “Nearly one in 10 (8.7%) ...

Alcohol large part of life for Aussie men

MORE than half of Australian males from as young as 14 years are drinking alcohol either daily or weekly, an Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) report says. In 2007, 58% of men surveyed were consuming alcohol either daily or weekly, with males aged 20–29 years most likely to be weekly drinkers and those over 60 most likely to drink alcohol daily, the report, The Health of Australia’s Males , found. Six per cent of the men surveyed drank alcohol at levels placing them at risk, and 4% at high risk, said the report, released ...

Alcohol link to cancer prompts advice to avoid alcohol entirely

ANY level of alcohol consumption increases a person’s cancer risk and the best approach is to “avoid alcohol altogether”, Cancer Council Australia (CCA) says in a new position statement. “For individuals who choose to drink alcohol, CCA recommends that they drink only within the National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines,” the document states. It says 5000 cancers, or 5% of all cancers, diagnosed in Australia annually were attributable to chronic alcohol use – chiefly cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and oesophagus, plus bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women.  Studies pointing to ...

Binge drinking linked to subtle cardiac injury

TRANSIENT myocardial changes can be detected by cardiac MRIs after an episode of binge drinking, concerning new research has revealed. A German study of 31 healthy volunteers found those who simulated binge-drinking episodes by consuming vodka over a four-hour period recorded a significant increase in median myocardial T2-signal intensity one day after the episode. Levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin were also increased among some of those in the bingeing cohort, suggesting subtle cardiac injury, the authors said. Three of those recording abnormal cardiac MRIs developed mild pericardial effusion. "This study demonstrated transient myocardial changes accompanied ...

Female beer drinkers at higher risk of psoriasis

FEMALE drinkers who prefer beer may need to reconsider their tipple of choice, now that research has confirmed they are at higher risk of developing psoriasis. A US cohort study in 82,869 women found those who drank light beer, white or red wine, or spirits were not at increased risk of psoriasis, but women who consumed five or more non-light beers per week had a 76% greater risk of self-reported psoriasis. Among a subset of patients with confirmed, rather than self-reported, psoriasis (1150 cases), the risk was more than twice that among those consuming five or more ...

Alcopops tax a bit of a fizzer

INTRODUCED to tackle teenage binge drinking, the ‘alcopops’ tax has had little impact on Australia’s alcohol consumption due to drinkers substituting with wine-based pre-mixed drinks instead. Associate Professor Chris Doran, a health economist from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC), presented unpublished data on alcohol consumption trends at the recent NDARC Symposium in Sydney. The review found that since the introduction of a 70% tax hike on spirit-based pre-mixed drinks in April 2008, total alcohol consumption had decreased by one per cent. However, total alcohol sales had increased by 3% from $30.3 billion in ...

Moderate drinking-CV protection claims ‘premature’

THE widely-touted benefits of moderate alcohol consumption may be merely a factor of social and health status rather than an effect of alcohol itself. An evaluation of a range of characteristics, including cardiovascular risk factors and health status, among 149,773 French subjects confirmed that mild or moderate drinkers had a superior biological and clinical profile compared to never, low or high drinkers. However, it was impossible to disentangle the protective effects of drinking from their consistent association with higher social level and superior overall health status. Therefore, while measures such as lower BMI, fasting triglycerides and ...

Rethink needed on reducing alcohol-related harm

A REALLOCATION of resources committed to reducing alcohol-related harm could lead to 10 times greater health gains for the same level of investment, experts say. They say new research aimed at “identifying an optimal package of interventions that provided the best value for money in reducing alcohol-related harm” shows that the current focus on random breath testing (RBT) may not provide the most cost-effective option. While RBT was a cost-effective intervention, it was less so than (in order of cost-effectiveness) volumetric taxation, advertising bans, an increase in the minimum legal drinking age to 21 years, brief intervention ...

Alcohol-injury data ‘vastly’ understated

Alcohol-injury data ‘vastly’ understated

HOSPITAL data vastly underplay the role of alcohol in injuries, with many hospitals failing to properly record when patients were drunk, researchers say.  As a result, current figures underestimate the burden of alcohol-related injuries by as much as 62%, according to a study in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health. The researchers call for changes in the use of International Statistical Classification of Disease (ICD) codes, saying it should be mandatory to use codes which define alcohol involvement by blood alcohol content and intoxication level.  Reviewing data from 4373 injury-related admissions to 50 ...

Excess weight burdens drinkers with higher liver disease risk

THE risk of liver disease may be increased among regular alcohol drinkers if they are also overweight. UK data shows that among women consuming 2.5 drinks per day, almost twice as many of those who are obese will develop liver cirrhosis compared to those of normal weight. Around 17% of cirrhosis was attributable to excess body weight compared with 42% attributable to alcohol, the authors said. Meanwhile data from cohort studies of 10,000 Scottish men reveals a similar picture: among those drinking 15 or more units of alcohol per week, the relative rates of liver disease mortality ...

Sponsors score runs on the board during televised sporting events

FOOD and alcohol companies are enjoying a marketing free kick through the amount of coverage their logos receive during televised sporting events, Australian experts say. Researchers from the Curtin University of Technology, WA, calculated that between 44% and 74% of the game time during three recent cricket matches resulted in clear exposure of sponsors’ logos, and the uninterrupted screening of a logo lasted up to 75 seconds. Additional food and beverage marketing was incorporated through television advertisements and ground advertising. “Regulation of energy-dense food and alcohol advertising should be legislated, not voluntary,” the authors said. “Controls ...

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement