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adolescents

The following articles have the tag adolescents

Teens motivated by looks rather than health

Teens motivated by looks rather than health

Appearance-based education, rather than health-based, motivates teens to modify high-risk sun exposure behaviour, new study finds.

Teen cannabis use may cause long-term brain damage

Teen cannabis use may cause long-term brain damage

ADOLESCENTS who are heavy cannabis users have abnormal changes in brain structures related to working memory more than two years after they have stopped using the drug, new US research shows.

Many girls missing out on full HPV vax

Many girls missing out on full HPV vax

LESS than three-quarters of girls aged 12—17 are fully vaccinated against HPV, with doses missed largely due to the logistical problems associated with administering three doses, according to the national program director.

Animal cruelty linked to empathy

Animal cruelty linked to empathy

CRUELTY towards animals is relatively prevalent among Australian teenagers and not just those with records of criminal offending.

Animal cruelty prevalent in Aussie teens

CRUELTY towards animals is relatively prevalent among Australian teenagers and not just those with records of criminal offending, conference delegates in Melbourne heard today.

Parents lack faith in confidential teen consults

Parents lack faith in confidential teen consults

CONFIDENTIAL consults with adolescents are viewed with concern by many parents, particularly those with a poor opinion of the medical profession, an Australian study suggests.

Australia behind the pack in tracking youth binge drinking

Australia behind the pack in tracking youth binge drinking

DESPITE all the concern in Australia about teenage binge drinking, the nation is not even collecting internationally comparable data on the problem, a researcher says.

School screening for depression mooted

SCHOOL-based delivery of screening for early signs of depression in adolescents would be a cost-effective move in Australia, health economists say.

Finding out if kids are depressed makes good financial sense

SCREENING adolescents for signs of depression – and then providing a psychological intervention where needed – represents good value for money, according to a study by Australian heath economists.

Most self-harming teens grow out of it

SELF-HARMING behaviour such as cutting and burning is reported by 8% of adolescents, an Australian study shows, but most abandon the practice by young adulthood.

Folate intake linked to academic performance

HIGHER folate intake has been linked, for the first time, to better academic performance in adolescents, independent of socioeconomic status and homocysteine levels. Researchers in Sweden took blood samples from 386 adolescents aged 15 years and gave them a questionnaire to enable assessment of health-related lifestyle activities and their parents’ education levels. The teenagers’ folate intake was estimated from dietary assessment, and their final semester academic grades from the final year of compulsory schooling were measured. “We found evidence that high folate intake is positively associated with academic achievement as assessed by school grades in Swedish ...

Distracted schoolgirls make better vax patients

SCHOOLGIRLS waiting for immunisation should be allowed distractions such as listening to iPods, say Australian researchers who witnessed sobbing, screaming and fainting on school vaccination days. Mass vaccination with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine under the National Immunisation Program posed challenges in school settings due to the "intense fear response" from adolescent girls, the researchers said. After interviews with 130 school girls, both vaccinated and unvaccinated, as well as parents, teachers and nurses, the researchers found long waits and witnessing other girls' vaccinations allowed fears to build, so that the atmosphere was much worse at the end of ...

Meningococcal C still a risk to youth even after vaccination

MOST Australian adolescents may be susceptible to meningococcal C (MenC) disease, despite childhood vaccination, researchers warn. A trial conducted in the UK to establish antibody persistence after vaccination with the MenC conjugate vaccine has raised questions about waning immunity. The Australian and British researchers found that the majority of six- to 12-year-olds in the UK, where children receive three shots in infancy, would have inadequate serological protection. In Australia, where children received a single dose of MenC vaccine at 12 months of age, the data suggested only a quarter may remain protected by the age of ...

Regular indoor tanning a bona fide addiction: experts

FREQUENT indoor tanning may be classified as an addiction for a sizeable number of users, and should be addressed in new skin cancer prevention strategies, US experts believe.  A study of 421 university students found among those who used indoor tanning facilities, 39% met DSM-IV criteria for substance-related addiction, while 30.6% met the criteria for addictive behaviour based on responses to the CAGE [Cut down, Annoyed, Guilty, Eye-opener] questionnaire used to screen for alcoholism. Indoor tanners with addictive behaviour also reported greater use of alcohol, marijuana and other substances and twice the rate of moderate to severe ...

Electronic media exposure not associated with headaches

FREQUENT use of electronic media by adolescents does not increase their risk of headaches, research suggests. German researchers compared length of computer use, watching TV, listening to music and use of mobile phones and games in 1025 adolescents with rates of migraines and tension-type headaches over a six-month period. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, no consistent association could be found, apart from a mild association from listening to music daily. “With respect to the current debate on adverse health effects of electronic media use, we cannot point to...specific types of headaches which might predominantly be ...

Gastric banding trumps lifestyle change in obese teens

GASTRIC banding is much more likely to be successful than lifestyle interventions among teens who are severely obese, Australian research shows. A trial among 50 Melbourne adolescents aged 14-18 years found the surgery led to losses of 50% or more of excess weight over the next two years, compared to only 13% in those assigned to a supervised regimen of diet and exercise alone. The study, conducted by the Centre for Obesity Research and Education at Monash University, recruited participants who had a BMI >35 plus medical complications including hypertension, abnormal lipids, asthma, back pain or psychosocial ...

Popularity at school is good for your ego and your health

WHILE many parents get concerned about their adolescent children’s desire to be part of the ‘in-crowd’, a Swedish study suggests popularity at that age may confer future health benefits. The study of 14,000 children born in 1953 found those who were less popular and powerful at school were four times more likely to require hospital treatment for hormonal, nutritional and metabolic diseases by age 50 than were their more popular classmates. The less popular students were also twice as likely to develop mental health and behavioural problems, and rates of self-harm and attempted suicide were also increased. ...

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