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pay for performance

The following articles have the tag pay for performance

Nothing to fear: GP performance indicators will be ‘voluntary’

GPs have been assured that recent media speculation that development of new performance management indicators will lead to pay-for-performance funding for general practice is completely unsubstantiated.

UK expert backs pay-for-performance models

A LEADING UK healthcare expert has endorsed the Gillard Government’s decision to pilot its pay-for-performance (PFP) diabetes care scheme, saying the controversial funding model is a potentially important element in the future of primary care. Dr Stephen Campbell, senior research fellow at the University of Manchester’s National Primary Care Research and Development Centre, told MO that a similar scheme introduced in the UK had proven the concept could work. Even better results could have been achieved if the scheme had been piloted before implementation, he added.  Dr Campbell was due to deliver a public lecture on the ...

Setback for pay-for-performance scheme

THE Gillard Government’s hopes for a future pay-for-performance diabetes scheme have been dealt another blow, with a UK study suggesting the change would encourage GP “gaming” and worsen health disparities. A study of 4000 patients with diabetes registered with 23 London practices found that pay-for-performance – which is already fully operational in the UK – encouraged crowded or “more deprived” clinics to exclude older and longer-term patients from reporting benchmarks. Excluded patients were less likely to achieve treatment targets, according to the study authors, who warned that “permitting physicians to exclude patients from pay-per-performance programs may worsen ...

Setback for pay-for-performance scheme

THE Gillard Government’s hopes for a future pay-for-performance diabetes scheme have been dealt another blow, with a UK study suggesting the change would encourage GP “gaming” and worsen health disparities. A study of 4000 patients with diabetes registered with 23 London practices found that pay-for-performance – which is already fully operational in the UK – encouraged crowded or “more deprived” clinics to exclude older and longer-term patients from reporting benchmarks. Excluded patients were less likely to achieve treatment targets, according to the study authors, who warned that “permitting physicians to exclude patients from pay-per-performance programs may worsen ...

Pay-for-performance schemes lack IT support

PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE schemes should not be viewed as a panacea for health system funding, experts warn, and health policy makers must give serious consideration to Australia’s health IT systems before starting on this path. Writing in this week’s MJA , researchers from the Australian National University and the University of Melbourne said Australia needed to take particular note of lessons learned from the failures of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) scheme used in the UK. Co-author Professor Anthony Scott, from Melbourne University’s Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, said the UK pay-for-performance system had largely ...

Roxon defends diabetes scheme after survey backlash

HEALTH Minister Nicola Roxon has been forced to defend the Government’s controversial block funded diabetes management scheme, with GPs overwhelmingly rejecting the scheme according to a new poll. A national online survey of 487 GPs conducted by the AMA found that just 4% of respondents planned to adopt the blended block funding and pay-for-performance model for diabetes management set to come into force from 2012. Sixty-four per cent of GPs said they would not sign up to the voluntary model while 32% remained unsure about the benefits of the new system over existing fee-for-service arrangements. The ...

Western Australia steadfast on GST takeover resistance

AS the deadline for the Federal Government’s health reforms looms, Western Australia is remaining firm on its refusal to sign up to the controversial plan. With new health funding arrangements set to commence from 1 July, WA remains the only state not to have signed up to the agreement, which would see the Government assume control of 30% of the states’ GST revenue. The revenue would be placed in a pool of funding used to finance health and hospital services. The deal would provide funding for increased GP training numbers, additional money for aged care as well ...

Govt targets HbA1c as marker of success

THE Federal Health Department has given the clearest signal yet that HbA1c levels will used as a benchmark to monitor improvement of patient care and outcomes under its controversial new diabetes funding scheme. The news has led to renewed calls from diabetes and primary care experts for caution in using the measure. There is also ongoing concern that such an indicator would be clinically inappropriate and difficult to implement given the limitations of existing national data. Previous concerns about have also been raised over GPs’ inability to control patient behaviour. Responding to questioning during recent Senate ...

GPs push AMA to take hard line on health reforms

The AMA federal council will be scrutinising voluntary patient enrolment, fundholding and pay for performance after delegates at the association’s National Conference supported two urgent motions on Saturday. Introducing his motion on Friday, Queensland GP Dr Shaun Rudd called on the AMA to condemn “attempts to procure voluntary registration and wholesale doctor patient fund-holding as unwarranted bureaucracy and a hazard to quality care”.  “The most important thing to me is an autonomous doctor patient relationship,” he said. “It [voluntary patient enrolment] is the worst thing that could happen to general practice.” Dr Rudd took aim at ...

AMA alternative to diabetes scheme gets RACGP backing

THE AMA’s recently-released alternative to the Rudd Government’s unpopular diabetes plan has won over the RACGP but at least one senior academic is unconvinced of its merits.  The alternative model comes a month after the Government unveiled its $436 million diabetes scheme, which will introduce voluntary patient enrolment and pay for performance into general practice. Under the AMA model, existing GP Management Plans would be simplified, allowing patients to access five allied health visits and selected home aids, including safety and mobility equipment, without the need for additional Team Care Arrangements. For patients with chronic and ...

GP income threatened by new diabetes scheme

GPs will need to look closely at their practice contracts to ensure their personal earnings don’t take a hit under the Government’s new diabetes scheme. The $436 million scheme will see practices awarded block-funding for each patient they enrol, plus an average bonus payment of $10,800 per year based partly on their performance in keeping patients healthy. Block funding will consist of annual payments of $1200 per enrolled patient, which will be split $950 for general practices and $250 for allied care. It remains unclear, however, whether the $250 for ...

Government splashes more cash to entice GPs on diabetes scheme

Government splashes more cash to entice GPs on diabetes scheme

PRACTICES will be offered an additional $1500 enticement if they sign up  for the Government’s controversial new diabetes management scheme. The scheme will see GPs rewarded for meeting patient care targets. The sweetener payments were revealed by the Government last week following widespread GP criticism of the controversial new plan, which will see patients with diabetes voluntarily enrol with a practices that will take responsibility for their management. Participating practices will also receive further bonus payments for achieving targeted levels of patient outcomes. The Government had already promised practices would be paid $1200 per year for each enrolled ...

Pay for performance improves care

PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE (P4P) programs are an effective way to encourage “low performing” physicians to lift the quality of their patient care, US researchers have claimed. In a four-year study that compared the work of physicians signed up to P4P to the work of those who were not, researchers noted that those in the programs were more likely to carry out the incentivised tasks. Low-performing physicians improved the most during the study, and were more likely to maintain these improvements, when compared to those not receiving incentives. Researchers examined seven preventive health and patient management tasks, including cervical ...

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